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The DDT Controversy

DDT is a pesticide discovered in 1939 by Paul Müller, a lifesaving scientist with a page on our site.  It was widely used in the United States and Europe to wipe out malaria by killing the mosquitoes that carry the disease. Its reputation problem began in the 1960s when Rachel Carson wrote Silent Spring, saying that pesticides such as DDT were ruinous to wildlife. In the 1970s DDT was banned in the United States and many other countries.

The ban set into motion a major controversy between two camps:
  • Those who wanted to use DDT because it didn’t harm humans.
  • Those who wanted to ban DDT because it hurt the environment.

After the almost forty years since the ban, scientific studies have suggested a truce that has been tepidly accepted, albeit reluctantly, by both camps. Many people now believe DDT can be used as a last resort to save human life as long as its use is limited so that it cannot hurt wildlife. This can be done by spraying it indoors on walls in malaria infested areas.

The controversy has not ended. Some still press for a ban. Others press for more liberal use of DDT.

The controversy we choose to address stems from this history. Words can easily change their meaning, especially when they become associated with vitriolic rhetoric. DDT’s name has been besmirched. The very mention of it conjures up images of anti-environmentalism. Is this right?
To form your own opinion, we provide below an article on the history of DDT, along with trivia, quotes, and a timeline. Additionally, we provide links where you can read the arguments of various interest groups. Some are objective information. Others are heated, self-righteous arguments that illuminate how emotional people become discussing DDT.


The Historical Story of DDT

Malaria is a big killer today. In 2006 it killed over 800,000 people. It is a disease caused by protozoan parasites that are deposited into people by infected Anopheles mosquitoes. Think of your child receiving a mosquito bite, then dying. In parts of the world that is common, because malaria is especially deadly for children. Once infected, if the person survives, fevers can recur for years, widely limiting economic productivity. It is especially a problem, both in mortality and economically, in Africa.

The pesticide DDT has been proven very effective at killing and deterring the mosquitoes that carry the disease. DDT was discovered by Paul Müller (see his lifesaving page here) in 1939 and was used to wipe malaria, which was then quite common, out of the United States. Between 1947 and 1951 over 4,650,000 homes were sprayed with DDT in thirteen southern states, after which no more cases occurred.

DDT was thought to be a miracle pesticide and was eventually used on over 300 agricultural products. By the late 1950s over half a pound per person was sprayed in the United States. Then in 1962 Rachel Carson’s book, Silent Spring, sprang onto the scene. It claimed that bird’s egg shells were thinning (especially those of birds such as the eagle) and other environmental problems were arising as a result of pesticides such as DDT. Because of pesticides and air and water pollution, which were also rampant, the environmental movement was born. In 1970 the Environmental Protection Agency was created. It banned DDT’s use in the United States.

The Controversy

Environmentalists pushing for a DDT ban seemed to have won. Other countries also banned it and some developing countries, threatened with a cut off of their economic aid, also quit using it.

But some humanitarians were upset. They claimed the ban was a death sentence to millions of people. And they had statistics. In Sri Lanka, the country’s malaria burden shrunk from 2.8 million cases in the 1940s to just 17 in 1965, due to the use of DDT. Five years after the country stopped using DDT, the number of cases had risen to 500,000. In the 1980’s Madagascar stopped using DDT and immediately had an epidemic of malaria, resulting in the death of more than 100,000 people. The humanitarians’ rage over the ban was summed up by Michael Crichton, author of Jurassic Park. One of his characters in the novel State of Fear says that banning DDT was “arguably the greatest tragedy of the twentieth century” and that the ban “killed more than Hitler.”

In 1998 a worldwide treaty to ban polluting chemicals known as POPS began being discussed. DDT was on their list, nicknamed the dirty dozen. Humanitarian groups formed to fight DDT’s inclusion, since malaria is a huge problem in Africa and DDT has proven to work well there. Scientific studies were performed. Confronted with their evidence, the parties to the POPS treaty agreed to grant DDT a “health-related exemption” until cost-effective, environmentally friendly alternatives could be found.


DDT Trivia

Prior to 1950,  malaria was common in the southern US, infecting 15,000 people a year and killing about the same number as scarlet fever.

Beginning in 1947, 4.6 million houses were sprayed in the United States, completely eradicating malaria from the country. Similar sprayings eradicated malaria from Europe.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) began as an organization to eradicate malaria. When malaria was gone, it sought other ways to benefit America. That’s why it’s located in Atlanta, GA, in the southern US.

In India when the DDT campaign began in 1953 there were 75 million malaria cases a year and 800,000 deaths. By 1966 there were fewer than a million annual cases of malaria and no deaths.

In parts of Indonesia, 25% of the population was infected by malaria. When DDT was introduced, the rate fell to 1%.

In Venezuela, the number of malaria cases dropped from 8 million to 800 when DDT was used.

Today,malaria still kills about 2,000 children a day, most in Africa.


Quotes About DDT

Paul Müller, on his discovery of DDT:
“My fly cage was so toxic after a short period that even after very thorough cleaning of the cage, untreated flies, on touching the walls, fell to the floor. I could carry on my trials only after dismantling the cage, having it thoroughly cleaned and after that leaving it for about one month in the open air.”


“The excellent DDT powder, which has been fully experimented with and found to yield astonishing results, will henceforth be used on a great scale by the British forces in Burma, and the American and Australian forces in the Pacific and India and in all theatres.”                     Winston Churchill

“After having tested different chemical combinations, you…made one of the greatest discoveries within the recent history of prophylactic medicine. DDT… kills the mosquito, which spreads malaria; the louse, which spreads typhus; the flea, which spreads the plague; and the sandfly, which spreads tropical diseases.”
- Gustaf Hellström, at the Nobel Prize ceremonies

“DDT is the single most effective agent ever developed for saving human life.”
- British politician Dick Taverne

“You could eat a spoonful of it and it wouldn't hurt you."
– Dr. Donald Roberts, Professor Uniformed Services University, on DDT

“Not even one peer-reviewed, independently replicated study linking exposure to DDT with any adverse health outcomes exists.”
- Amir Attaran, 2000 British Medical Journal essay

“If there’s nothing else and it’s going to save lives, we’re all for it. Nobody’s dogmatic about it.”
- Greenpeace spokesperson Rick Hind, after Greenpeace stopped their effort to completely ban DDT


DDT Timeline

1930s - Malaria was common in the Southern United States.
1935 - Paul Müller begins a search for a new and better pesticide in Switzerland.
1939 - DDT discovered by Paul Müller.
1947 - In 13 southern states, over 4,650,000 houses were sprayed with DDT.
1948 - Paul Müller awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine.
1949 - Malaria eradicated from Italy.
1951 - Malaria eradicated from the U.S.
1955 - The World Health Organization (WHO) makes plans to eradicate malaria worldwide.
1959 - More than 80 million lbs of DDT was sprayed over the US (half a pound per person).
1961 - DDT use reaches its peak. It is registered for use on 334 agricultural products.
1962 - Rachel Carson’s book Silent Spring blamed environmental destruction on DDT.
1964 - Rachel Carson died.
1965 - Paul Müller died.
1969 - Residues of DDT and its metabolites (such as DDE) found worldwide.
1970 - WHO announces that malaria has been eradicated in 37 countries.
1972 - EPA bans DDT in the U.S.
1976 - WHO gives up on eradicating malaria.
1998 - POPS Treaty proposes banning DDT.
2001 - POPS Treaty grants a temporary health-related exemption for use of DDT for malaria.


Further Reading

Positions in Favor of the use of DDT to Curtail Malaria

American Council on Science and Health
The DDT Ban Turns 30 – Millions Dead of Malaria Because of Ban, More Deaths Likely
By Todd Seavey
A 2002 Article giving the history of DDT’s use and arguing for its continued use to prevent malaria.
http://www.acsh.org/healthissues/newsID.442/healthissue_detail.asp

DDT Works
by Roger Bate
An article in support of DDT.
http://www.prospect-magazine.co.uk/article_details.php?id=10176


Environmentalist Positions

Rehabilitating Carson
by John Quiggin and Tim Lambert
An article in support of Rachel Carson.
http://www.prospect-magazine.co.uk/article_details.php?id=10175

The DDT Ban Myth
By Jim Norton
An article claiming that DDT was banned only because mosquitoes are resistant to it.
http://info-pollution.com/ddtban.htm

Environmental Defense Fund
The U.S. Ban on DDT: A Continuing Success Story
April 4, 2005
A  paper stating that the treaty granting some indoor use of DDT is temporarily ok, but DDT should eventually be completely banned.
http://www.edf.org/article.cfm?contentID=4407


Does DDT Harm The Eggshells of Birds?

ReasonOnLine
DDT, Eggshells, and Me
Cracking open the facts on birds and banned pesticides
Ronald Bailey, January 7, 2004
An article on whether or not Eggshells are harmed by DDT.
http://www.reason.com/news/show/34742.html


General DDT and Malaria Information and News

AllAfrica.com
Daily Monitor: UN Seeks Ban DDT Pesticide, And Fight Malaria
A news article stating that the United Nation seeks to stop the use of DDT worldwide by 2020.
http://allafrica.com/stories/200905080301.html

World Health Organization
World Malaria Report 2008
A comprehensive look at the problem of malaria.
http://apps.who.int/malaria/wmr2008/

Centers for Disease Control
Malaria: Vector Control
An article on various methods of eliminating mosquitoes, the carriers of malaria.
http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/control_prevention/vector_control.htm

 
Comments (47)
47 Monday, 08 September 2014 12:48
jimmy
would like to see how DDT would be in the future (2014 and up ).
46 Friday, 15 August 2014 15:09
Entomologist
“European nations and the United States used insecticides to rid themselves of disease and then pulled up the ladder, denying Africans, Asians and Latin Americans the benefits of those same insecticides,” explain Dr. Donald Roberts and Richard Tren in their 2010 exposé, The Excellent Powder: DDT’s Political and Scientific History. Wealthy nations merit this accusation because before the advent of DDT, parasitic diseases like malaria, typhus, and yellow fever had plagued their own shores for centuries. These infections are known as vector-borne diseases because insects (i.e., vectors) carry disease-causing parasites from person to person.

When DDT first came into use as a pesticide, many called it miraculous, which was hardly an exaggeration considered in perspective. Until then, yellow fever claimed so many lives it was known in the United States as the “Scourge of the South.” The French abandoned efforts in the 1880s to construct the Panama Canal because malaria killed so many workers. Typhus, the disease that took the life of diarist Anne Frank, was once feared as deadlier than any weapon of war in Europe. Yet in a period of three weeks in 1943, DDT wiped out one of history’s deadliest typhus outbreaks in Naples, Italy. In fact DDT’s effectiveness has made all these disease names as antiquated to our ears as scurvy and the plague.

Leftist eugenics through the Club of Rome, Sierra Club and Audubon Society commit genocide indirectly. The evil must be exposed and conquered soon. DDT, R12 are safe and there is no ozone depletion, global warming, or climate change. These fairy tale scenarios are bunk. Anyone who takes it as truth can be fooled by a child.
45 Friday, 15 August 2014 15:06
Entomologist
“European nations and the United States used insecticides to rid themselves of disease and then pulled up the ladder, denying Africans, Asians and Latin Americans the benefits of those same insecticides,” explain Dr. Donald Roberts and Richard Tren in their 2010 exposé, The Excellent Powder: DDT’s Political and Scientific History. Wealthy nations merit this accusation because before the advent of DDT, parasitic diseases like malaria, typhus, and yellow fever had plagued their own shores for centuries. These infections are known as vector-borne diseases because insects (i.e., vectors) carry disease-causing parasites from person to person.

When DDT first came into use as a pesticide, many called it miraculous, which was hardly an exaggeration considered in perspective. Until then, yellow fever claimed so many lives it was known in the United States as the “Scourge of the South.” The French abandoned efforts in the 1880s to construct the Panama Canal because malaria killed so many workers. Typhus, the disease that took the life of diarist Anne Frank, was once feared as deadlier than any weapon of war in Europe. Yet in a period of three weeks in 1943, DDT wiped out one of history’s deadliest typhus outbreaks in Naples, Italy. In fact DDT’s effectiveness has made all these disease names as antiquated to our ears as scurvy and the plague.

Leftist eugenics through the Club of Rome, Sierra Club and Audubon Society commit genocide indirectly. The evil must be exposed and conquered soon.
44 Thursday, 14 August 2014 21:13
Baba Ceesay
DDT is effective and I think Africans should encourage it usage. After a host of spraying campaign in The Gambia, malaria cases have reduce to some extent.
43 Friday, 01 August 2014 14:21
Harald K
This post uses Roger Bates as a source, and repeats his misinformation.

DDT was never banned for public health use, it was banned for agricultural use. The reason the world stopped using DDT was that mosquitoes developed resistance to it.

Roger Bates's "Africa Fighting Malaria" is an astroturf operation - it pretends to be a grassroots organization, but it isn't. It's a PR front group started to smear the environmental movement - you can even see Bates making his sales pitch to Philip Morris in the tobacco archives.
42 Sunday, 27 July 2014 11:42
Don
Like many of you reading this, my friends and I would ride in the fog of DDT on our bicycles when the mosquito truck went down the road and run through the fog at the drive in theaters. I agree that DDT was somewhat overused in the 60's but nothing has been as effective and I think it should be available now, especially in places that have malaria deaths on a daily basis.
41 Sunday, 27 July 2014 11:39
Don
Like many of you reading this, my friends and I would ride in the fog of DDT on our bicycles when the mosquito truck went down the road and run through the fog at the drive in theaters. I agree that DDT was somewhat overused in the 60's but nothing has been as effective and I think it should be available now, especially in places that have malaria deaths on a daily basis.
40 Wednesday, 09 July 2014 17:38
Stop liberal junk science
The alleged thinning of eggshells by DDT in the diet was
effective propaganda; however, actual feeding experiments
proved that there was very little, if any, correlation between DDT levels and shell thickness. Thin shells may result when birds are exposed to fear, restraint, mercury, lead, parathion, or other agents, or when deprived of adequate calcium, phosphorus, Vitamin D, light, calories, or water. While quail fed a diet containing 2 percent calcium produced thick shells, a calcium content of only 1
percent resulted in shells 9 percent thinner than normal. In the presence of lead, shells were 14 percent thinner, and with mercury, 8 percent thinner.
39 Thursday, 05 June 2014 14:16
malaylay
I think that the state did a great job to ban DDT.
38 Saturday, 17 May 2014 15:34
Facts not rants
in 1962, when a total of 80 million kilograms of the pesticide were used around the world. The National Academy of Sciences summarized the efficacy of DDT as follows:

“To only a few chemicals does man owe as great a debt as to DDT. It is estimated that, in little more than two decades DDT has prevented 500 million human deaths, due to malaria, that would otherwise have been inevitable.”
37 Saturday, 17 May 2014 15:32
factsnotrants
in 1962, when a total of 80 million kilograms of the pesticide were used around the world. The National Academy of Sciences summarized the efficacy of DDT as follows:

“To only a few chemicals does man owe as great a debt as to DDT. It is estimated that, in little more than two decades DDT has prevented 500 million human deaths, due to malaria, that would otherwise have been inevitable.”
36 Saturday, 17 May 2014 15:28
factsnotrants
in 1962, when a total of 80 million kilograms of the pesticide were used around the world. The National Academy of Sciences summarized the efficacy of DDT as follows:

“To only a few chemicals does man owe as great a debt as to DDT. It is estimated that, in little more than two decades DDT has prevented 500 million human deaths, due to malaria, that would otherwise have been inevitable.”
35 Thursday, 08 May 2014 11:45
ur mom
i love mosquitoes so much
34 Tuesday, 01 April 2014 16:57
the great
ddt is most famous for its effects on birds. Some research have shown that for certain species, ddt causes the thinning of eggshells. some species affected by ddt : osprey eagles, pelicans, falcons, hawks
please do not utilize ddt
be careful
33 Tuesday, 01 April 2014 16:51
great**
DDT is most famous for its effect on birds. Some research have shown that for certain species, DDT causes the thinning of eggshells.

Some species affected by DDT:
osprey
eagles
pelicans
falcons
hawks
Please do Not.utilize it
Be careful
32 Tuesday, 01 April 2014 16:49
great**
DDT is most famous for its effect on birds. Some research have shown that for certain species, DDT causes the thinning of eggshells.

Some species affected by DDT:
osprey
eagles
pelicans
falcons
hawks
Please do Not utilize it.
Be careful
31 Tuesday, 01 April 2014 16:47
great**
DDT is most famous for its effect on birds. Some research have shown that for certain species, DDT causes the thinning of eggshells.

Some species affected by DDT:
osprey
eagles
pelicans
falcons
hawks
Please do Not utilize it.
Be careful
30 Tuesday, 01 April 2014 15:17
M.Teacher
Although DDT and other pesticides have helped kill harmful bacteria, it has also proved detrimental for human health. We, as people, are just a part of the nature. We cannot be in war with the other living beings. If people had not changed the balance of the planet, we would never have suffered from maladies/blights/plagues. Also, we would not pesticides or even medicines today! The best solution seems to learn to live in harmony with the nature again.
29 Tuesday, 01 April 2014 15:15
m.teacher
Although DDT and other pesticides have helped kill harmful bacteria, it has also proved detrimental for human health. We, as people, are just a part of the nature. We cannot be in war with the other living beings. If people had not changed the balance of the planet, we would never have suffered from maladies/blights/plagues. Also, we would not pesticides or even medicines today! The best solution seems to learn to live in harmony with the nature again.
28 Tuesday, 01 April 2014 15:11
M.Teacher
Although DDT and other pesticides have helped kill harmful bacteria, it has also proved detrimental for human health. We, as people, are just a part of the nature. We cannot be in war with the other living beings. If people had not changed the balance of the planet, we would never have suffered from maladies/blights/plagues. Also, we would not pesticides or even medicines today! The best solution seems to learn to live in harmony with the nature again.
27 Tuesday, 01 April 2014 13:30
Turkish Gambit
Dear Turkish Scientist, what is your reference to prove your idea
26 Tuesday, 01 April 2014 13:21
The break time
Scientists reveal clearly that DDT has countless harms to our life and our enviroment. Nevertheless, if we continue to say that we must or have to use it, it means that we escape from facing the facts. We eat and drink to survive or live more. It's nonsense that we prefer food that including killer chemicals.
25 Tuesday, 01 April 2014 10:40
Turkish scientist
I disagree turkish gambit.I think ddt is necessary to improve our live. People can obtain better vegetable thanks to ddt because it kill insects.
24 Tuesday, 01 April 2014 02:59
Syrian boy
i think DDT is something dangerous because it has negative effect on human's genes, it makes cancer come more than the past and we will see young people get cancer!. Moreover, it leads to kill many beneficial insects as bees or butterflies and we know plants and flowers need them!!. Therefor, ban DDT is a right decision for us and for the environment, For the world
23 Tuesday, 01 April 2014 02:52
Turkish Gambit
Why do you support DDT? Are you crazy? I think you earn money from chemical companies. Greetings from Istanbul, Capital of New Turkey
22 Tuesday, 01 April 2014 02:44
X!X
W T F
21 Tuesday, 01 April 2014 02:43
X!X
W T F
20 Saturday, 08 February 2014 13:47
Yo Mama
DDT tastes good. It tastes like my arm. :)
19 Sunday, 10 November 2013 14:24
ConcernedCitizen
First of all, to those of you who are saying that DDT is perfectly safe and people who do not support DDT are ignorant, you are being very hypocritical. DDT is not a safe substance. If we had continued to use it in the excess we did during the 50's and 60's, many species would be extinct and ecosystems would have been negatively affected, and humans would definitely be experiencing the long-term sufferings of the pesticide.
I do not think it is bad to use DDT in small doses, when it is necessary. There are many alternatives to DDT in order to control diseases. For example, scientists have discovered that they can inject Wolbachia (a bacterium)into mosquitoes to prevent them from passing Dengue to humans! I think this is a truly wonderful discovery as it helps save human lives, and it has no negative implications on the environment. They are trying to find a similar way to take care of malaria. I believe that this is the proper course to take, because there are also no negative effects on humans. Moderation and balance is key. We kill nature, nature kills us.
If we added on 40 years of heavy DDT usage, I believe we would be living in a very different world... one that I don't think I would be able to survive in. I hate it that humans seem to think that their lives are the only ones that are keeping the Earth together. All lives are valuable and inter-connected. We must all work together to make things better.
I know that people do not care to hear what I have to say, and that many of you out there will think I'm just being ridiculous and a crazy "tree-hugger", but I have always supported humans and nature, and I have always waited for the day to see harmony and true happiness envelop the living world, in order to make the world a better place to live.
18 Monday, 04 November 2013 01:08
ss
s
17 Monday, 04 November 2013 01:04
Wow
wow i'm amazed by how ignorant a lot of people here sounds. Links of DDT to human health effects are still fragile, maybe stronger in some animals, which means THERE ARE NO SCIENTIFIC RESULTS OF WHAT DDT DOES NEGATIVELY TO HUMAN YET. But deaths by malaria of millions are true and happening everyday. Name one person that has died directly from DDT.
And you know what? I bet if DDT had not been eradicated in the US, we wouldnt have stopped using it either. Cuz human lives are at stake.
16 Thursday, 26 September 2013 15:58
Unknows
If you guys want DDT you want death. DDT was killing animals and killing us. Yes it was stoping malaria but it was making other daisies.
15 Friday, 14 June 2013 03:25
richard
saving wildlife is very important but terminate malaria and harmful insects more important ... however we can achieve the two purposes if we have wisdom
14 Tuesday, 07 May 2013 13:52
DDT was never banned for use against malaria..ever.
DDT resistant mosquitoes developed as far back as the 1950's. The use for malarial control was never banned under the Stockholm convention. Agricultural use was restricted to increase the effectiveness of use against malaria. Only right wing anti science idiots think a ddt (for use against malaria) ban existed. For more see the video "DDT ban killed millions - wrong" on youtube.
13 Friday, 22 February 2013 15:24
Tessie
DDT obviously helped control Malaria cases in SEA countries before the 1970s. If DDT can control Malaria and can inhibit those insects that are resistant to our current pesticides, then I don't see no reason for the ban? Or is it because we want to produce more weaker pesticides to boost revenue taxes, increase Malaria patients to support hospitals, more death to reduce the unpreventable increase of human population, and so on. The use of mosquito nets is less helpful, and still, the Malaria Hospitals are flooded with patients.
12 Wednesday, 23 January 2013 18:02
Owen McGregor
This article is extremely biased, links to non-scientific, non-peer reviewed articles and you should feel bad
11 Friday, 30 November 2012 04:25
Scotty Weir
"They should out right ban DDT because there are newer safer and more effective forms out there now!" Please name them and show how effective they really are. Deildrin is also no longer available so we now have termites eating peoples houses. DDT did stop lots of pests. Bring back DDT!!!!!!!
10 Thursday, 18 October 2012 22:08
Out right Ban
They should out right ban DDT because there are newer safer and more effective forms out there now!
9 Sunday, 08 July 2012 10:24
Malachi Bellah
I think since the lack of DDT use has caused more recorded human deaths than WWII we should have it everywhere. especially in 3rd world countries... Unless you have no care for millions of people dying horrific and painful deaths and have no heart.

Are we placing more value on an animal than on a human life?
8 Sunday, 27 November 2011 17:16
tobby
i think we shouldnt have ddt because it is killing animals and after so much use we wont have anymore of the animals that are left that get affected by ddt!
7 Wednesday, 09 November 2011 23:07
Chloe
I don't think such things will ever be answered with a straight yes or no. I think the WHO is handling the DDT situation in the most appropriate manner. When other, safer, effective alternatives are discovered, DDT use can be cut.
6 Thursday, 15 September 2011 08:50
SEXY BLUE MONKEYS
The best example of DDT's effectiveness is South Africa. Under international pressure, South Africa stopped DDT spraying in 1999 and death rates spiked up. Half of these deaths were children under five. South Africa went back to DDT in 2000 and promptly reduced malaria rates by seventy-five percent. Nevertheless, international aid agencies continue to refuse to support DDT use. They threaten to withhold aid from countries that use the pesticide. In Sri Lanka, the country’s malaria burden shrunk from 2.8 million cases in the 1940s to just 17 in 1965, due to the use of DDT

i think we shouldnt bring back DDT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
5 Thursday, 15 September 2011 08:44
3
i think they shouldnt keep the ddt... i think this because it causes biological magnification which can kill more people than it would with using ddt.
4 Thursday, 15 September 2011 08:44
TeddyBear
good read...i think we should get rid of ddt
3 Wednesday, 25 August 2010 16:37
Kathy
I agree with everything Tony says
2 Sunday, 22 August 2010 20:27
Tony Larraz
Those blood-suckers, worldly known as bed bugs, are a national problem which is about to create a pandemia. There are in every state of the United States disrupting the life of everyone. Even if those pests don't transmit disease, they can be harmful to mental health. People cannot rest well at night,they stay awake all night just waiting and watching to prevent the next bite.
The enviroment cannot be more important than human lives. Just imagine a baby or a small child biten by one of those small vampires.
I am totally in favor for the return of DDT to control this infectation. Considering the traffic of people coming from third world countries, well known around the world for their poor hygiene it is time for the government to respond to the need of its citizens. DDT should be put back in the market, and at a reasonable price, not to speculate and make fortunes at citizens need.
1 Saturday, 13 June 2009 15:17
Jerry
I am for anything that kills those blood-suckers.

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