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Tshirt Tales

A Community of Rambunctious Scholars Celebrating People
Who Have Made Lifesaving Discoveries And Encouraging
Students and Politicians to Read 1000 Science Stories!

ScienceHeroes.com Quotes
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The Akira Endo

'Who's Your Science Hero' Seesaw T-Shirt


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Akira Endo lives in Tokyo, Japan. He discovered the class of drugs that lower cholesterol, known as statins. "Statins are to cardiovascular disease what penicillin was to infectious disease," says Professor Leon Simons, of Sydney, Australia. Heart disease, much of it caused by high cholesterol, is the biggest killer in western countries. Now doctors have a drug that fights it and eight percent of Americans take Endo's drug daily.

Spelled out in Japanese pictograms on the front of the shirt is his name. The image is of Endo demonstrating to anime kids how to lift people up, away from the jaws of death. On the back of the shirt is Endo's famous quote: "The discovery of the medicine was a continuation of difficulty which was like a seesaw." We use it on the shirt because it is a metaphor for his life as well.

Endo has experienced a lot in his life. Born just before World War II in rural Japan, Endo recalls, "We lost the war. Even adults did not know what to do. We did not have food and clothes. Everything was called off. Even kids lost their dream. It was so hard that even kids did not have hope." Endo's brilliance lifted him into the corporate world where he sought a medicine that would curb too much cholesterol in a person's blood. He spent years going through 6,392 strains of fungi until he found a promising substance, the first drug now known as a statin. Endo endured many more years of trials and tribulations before it became a prescribed drug. Now statins are the biggest selling drug ever with sales having surpassed $100 billion. And those sales have financed more corporate drug research than that of any other drug. Endo never received any money from the sale of his drug (a dark story told in the book). Nor much recognition. He is virtually unknown in the U.S.

About the ups and downs, Endo is philosophical. He says, "Nowadays, it is said that money is important. However, we can find the pleasure of life and the value, when we do something for the world with a sense of mission. What I have done was rather for the world than a Japanese company or Japan. It was needed all over the world, so I challenged for it."

Unlike revenue from his drug, a portion of every sale of the Akira Endo T-shirt and poster does go to Dr. Endo.

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The Al Sommer

'Who's Your Science Hero' Eye T-Shirt



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Al Sommer, of Johns Hopkins University, is an action hero in the science world. He lived through the most devastating cyclone in history, ferried furtive associates out of Bangladesh during a civil war, and was on hand for three of the biggest medical advances of the twentieth century. While in Bangladesh, he helped to wipe smallpox off the face of the earth and to prove Oral Rehydration Therapy is the best treatment for cholera. But his most significant role played out in Indonesia where he made his own discovery that forever changed world health.

Working for years on night blindness, Sommer, an eye doctor, discovered that Vitamin A deficiency not only led to night blindness, but also to childhood death. He has worked tirelessly ever since to get vitamin pills into the little mouths of children throughout the world.

Since Al Sommer has spent his life looking into eyes and his career could be thought of as larger than life, we thought an eye should dominate his T-shirt. If you look closely, you will see a picture of him in the pupil of the eye. Looking closely at data was key to his discoveries. Also an epidemiologist (someone who studies disease in populations), Sommer is renowned for his quotable statements. We put a short quote on the shirt and offer some longer ones on the poster and here:

"You come into contact with marvelous people - marvelous people locally who are very much committed to moving a country forward and marvelous people who have gathered from around the world in order to work in places like this - a rather extraordinary social and professional opportunity on our part and experience, and that changed my whole orientation towards medicine and towards the areas of research that I wanted to carry out."

"I say ‘data talk to me, tell me what you have to say.... You have to know your data, you have to smell it, you have to be in it. If you're not living inside the data you are going to miss the most interesting things, because the most interesting things are not going to be the questions you originally proposed; the interesting things are going to be questions you hadn't thought about."

So, as you wear your Al Sommer Eye T-shirt, think of some questions you haven't thought about and maybe you too can make a life-changing discovery.

By purchasing this T-shirt you are also rewarding Dr. Sommer.
Part of the proceeds of this T-shirt go to him.

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The Karl Landsteiner

'Who's Your Science Hero' Blood Groupie T-Shirt




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Our Blood Groupie T-shirt is one of our most popular. We chose the groupie reference for fun. While Karl's personality was usually reserved - after all he was known as the melancholy genius - he also had a sense of humor. In his Austrian days he brought his dog to work with him and let him sit under his desk. Around lunchtime every day Waldi would start barking and Landsteiner would playfully reprimand him, "Waldi, you've not an atom of respect for science."

The groupie reference is a pun that is accurate for two meanings. Landsteiner is certainly worthy of the ardent adulation of a rock star groupie and each of our blood types does correspond to a group. We personalize your shirt by letting you choose the blood group of your choice.

Also on the T-shirt and poster is blood. Blood dripping everywhere.... It had long been thought to be the symbol of death. We placed Karl Landsteiner strategically in a cell (blood, not prison) since he was able to free so many people from a death sentence. Prior to his discovery, people tragically died if they bled profusely due to injury or illness. Landsteiner, brilliant in many fields, discovered blood types with an elegant experiment in 1901. It then became possible to receive a transfusion, and to escape the death sentence. Landsteiner's discovery of blood cell types turned blood from the emblem of death, to a beautiful symbol of life. So wear your shirt proudly - Red blood cells are an exquisite insignia of life that Karl Landsteiner has bequeathed to us all.

"It soon became clear, however, that the reactions follow a pattern, which is valid for the blood of all humans, and that the peculiarities discovered are just as characteristic of the individual as are the serological features peculiar to an animal species."
- Karl Landsteiner, in his Nobel Prize lecture


Blood Transfusion Facts

beaker_icon At least 25 blood groups have been identified.
beaker_icon The most important ones were those discovered by Landsteiner and his associates.
beaker_icon Almost 4 million Americans receive gifts of blood each year.
beaker_icon Worldwide, 80 million units are donated annually.
beaker_icon World War I started the wide-spread use of blood transfusions.
beaker_icon Almost half of the U.S. population has donated blood at some time, making it impossible not to be optimistic about humankind's compassion.











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Karl Landsteiner Blood T-shirt

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Blood dripping everywhere.... It had long been thought to be the symbol of death. We chose blood flowing over this shirt with Karl Landsteiner placed strategically in a cell (blood, not prison) since he was able to free so many people from a death sentence. Prior to his discovery, people tragically died if they bled profusely due to injury or illness. Landsteiner, brilliant in many fields, discovered blood types with an elegant experiment in 1901. It then became possible to receive a transfusion, and to escape the death sentence. Landsteiner's discovery of blood cell types turned blood from the emblem of death, to a beautiful symbol of life. So wear your shirt proudly - Red blood cells are an exquisite insignia of life that Karl Landsteiner has bequeathed to us all.

"It soon became clear, however, that the reactions follow a pattern, which is valid for the blood of all humans, and that the peculiarities discovered are just as characteristic of the individual as are the serological features peculiar to an animal species."
- Karl Landsteiner, in his Nobel Prize lecture


beaker_icon Landsteiner published 346 scientific articles, and can be considered a founding father in the fields of immunology, polio, and allergy, as well as hematology.
beaker_icon To Landsteiner, the experiment was the excitement. He was an inductive master. The truth was not obtained by guessing, it was obtained by piling up the facts until the facts manifest a new biological function. So like a lone cowboy, he rode off into the unexplored canyons of science and over the next decades made prodigious discoveries.
- Billy Woodward, author of Scientists Greater than Einstein
beaker_icon When Landsteiner discovered blood groups, his main job was as a pathologist. He performed 3,639 autopsies over the ten years he held that job.
beaker_icon Whether due to all the autopsies or perhaps having seen the devastation of World War I and watching the rise of Hitler, Landsteiner was not an optimist. His reserved personality brought him the monikers of the "the investigator with the mournful eyes" and the "melancholy genius."


















Blood Transfusion Facts


beaker_icon At least 25 blood groups have been identified.
beaker_icon The most important ones were those discovered by Landsteiner and his associates.
beaker_icon Almost 4 million Americans receive gifts of blood each year.
beaker_icon Worldwide, 80 million units are donated annually.
beaker_icon World War I started the wide-spread use of blood transfusions.
beaker_icon Almost half of the U.S. population has donated blood at some time, making it impossible not to be optimistic about humankind's compassion.













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The You Say Insulin He Said Isletin

'Who's Your Science Hero' Insulin T-Shirt


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The story of how insulin came to be named is emblematic of the difficulties Frederick Banting, its discoverer, had in making it.

In 1920, Frederick Banting asked John Macleod of the University of Toronto and one of the world's leading authorities on diabetes, for the chance to test his hypothesis, that the substance now so well known as insulin, could be isolated from the pancreases of dogs. Macleod, a conventional academic, was skeptical not only of Banting's hypothesis, but also of Banting, since he had never performed any original research before anywhere. Disconsolate but stubborn, Banting kept asking until the reluctant Macleod finally agreed to allow him use of the university's old and vacant laboratory space while he went to Europe for the summer of 1921.

Overcoming problem after problem, Banting and a graduate student helper, Charles Best, isolated insulin from first the pancreases of dogs, and then ultimately in the biggest breakthrough, from cattle. Impassioned with their success, they named the substance isletin, after the Islets of Langerhans, specific cells that lie like islands in the pancreas, from which they had isolated their new and precious substance so desperately needed by diabetics.

When Macleod returned from Europe and saw Banting's success he joined the research, adding the full resources of the university. Soon Banting was overshadowed. Shunted aside, he became depressed and quit the research altogether, lying alone in his rented room, getting drunk each night and keeping the other boarders awake singing, "It's a long, long way to Tipperary."

When the research hit a snag Best persuaded Banting to return and insulin was eventually produced in a purified form. Macleod, perhaps knowing that the substance had already been referred to as insuline in 1914 by another hypothesizing scientist (who was unable to isolate it), chose to follow the conventional academic tradition of naming things in Latin. He renamed it insulin after the Latin insula, meaning island. He claimed isletin would be an awkward sounding word. Since Banting had no standing at the university or in the academic world, he had no choice but to go along. So the first modern miracle drug, which turned childhood diabetes from 100% fatal to 100% survivable, became known as insulin. And the unconventional researcher, Frederick Banting, had his proudly chosen name, isletin, shunted aside and lost to history.

The photograph on the T-shirt and Poster is of a lifesaving insulin syringe. It was taken by Leonard Gay using a Canon 5D camera and a 100 mm close up lens. The syringe was held still in a clamp and various lighting techniques were tried. After many hours, the effect was produced by shining two flashlights at the needle, one at a front and another at a back angle. Leonard only snapped the shutter three times using the two flashlights, but out of the one hundred photos taken, it was the most interesting. Enjoy your T-shirt celebrating Banting's work that has saved the lives of over 16 million diabetics!

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The Bacteria Sing The Blues

'Who's Your Science Hero' Penicillin T-Shirt



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Bacteria have been singing the blues ever since penicillin was developed by Howard Florey and his team at Oxford University in the 1940s.

Florey was an Australian by birth with a good sense of humor, but like much humor, Florey's conclusion upon graduating from medical school revealed a lot of truth: "I'm now ‘Doctor' to the patients and I have to cover my ignorance by waving my arms and looking grave." At least that was true before doctors had drugs like penicillin. Penicillin was the first antibiotic - the first drug to kill bacteria.

Bacteria are single-celled organisms that are everywhere

They can be found forty miles up in the stratosphere and miles below the ocean floor.  Each square centimeter of your skin carries about 100,000 bacteria. Most of us carry around 500 species that add about three pounds to our body weight. Some are good, ruminating in our gut to aid digestion, but some bacteria are bad and if they invade the body, they cause disease.

Laboratorians stain bacterial samples to identify if they are a type known as gram positive, which penicillin often can kill. If they are gram positive, the bacteria turn purple. Hence, the purple shirt and the purple bacterium singing the blues.

How hard was it to make penicillin?

Florey formed a team at Oxford University to try to develop penicillin. Penicillin was so difficult to make that after eighteen months of long hours, overcoming immense difficulties, they had produced 2.4 grams. They later learned that 2.4 grams was the ideal daily dose for a single person!  That one dose actually marked the beginning of the age of modern medicine.  Lewis Thomas, Dean of Yale Medical School, described penicillin’s impact on his generation of doctors: “We could hardly believe our eyes on seeing that bacteria could be killed off without at the same time killing the patient. It was not just amazement, it was a revolution."

The illustration of the petri dish on the poster shows how they tested the strength of penicillin. Into a bacteria laden petri dish, they dropped penicillin down porcelain tubes. Later they measured the circles around the tubes, which were the areas of killed bacteria.


This is a shirt of freedom. Freedom from infection! Before antibiotics, people died from things we hardly even think about now. President Calvin Coolidge's son died from an infection he got as a result of a blister received while playing tennis. Harry Houdini died from an infection after an attack of appendicitis. Penicillin was magical like no other drug because it cured so many diseases: syphilis, gonorrhea, childbed fever, septicemia, meningitis, scarlet fever, gas gangrene, anthrax, tetanus, rheumatic fever, lobar pneumonia, and diphtheria. Today, we can be thankful for Howard Florey and his discovery which has saved over 80 million lives.


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The Women Who Whooped  Whooping Cough

'Who's Your Science Hero' Whooping Cough T-Shirt



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The Whooping Crane pictured on this shirt is an endangered bird in North America, named for the whooping sound of its call. Whooping cough was also named for its awful sound. In the early 1940's it was killing up to 6,000 children a year.

But then along came......Grace & Pearl. In the 1930s, women were unlikely medical warriors. In fact, Grace Eldering's first job was as a volunteer at a laboratory since she couldn't get hired to a paying job because she was a woman. Even when they obtained jobs, these women were unwilling to bow to the customs of the day. Doing their required work during the day, they set their sights on finding a vaccination for whooping cough at night. They even recruited First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt, to help them with their cause. She helped promote their vaccine. Because of their tenacity and can-do spirit, they were able to accomplish a whopping feat - they whooped whooping cough! Now it is an "endangered" disease. Let's hope it becomes extinct!


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The ScienceHeroes.com T-Shirt



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ScienceHeroes.com is a celebration of scientists who have saved people's lives through their arduous and brilliant discoveries.

We began by asking, what could be greater than saving a fellow human's life? Everything that a saved person does thereafter, everything their progeny do forever after, is all due to a scientist using much of their life to study endless hours and take arduous effort of thought and experimentation to reach out and help another human being.

Even though lifesaving scientists have saved more than 2 billion lives, oddly enough most are little known. We at ScienceHeroes.com are a rambunctious group of scholars out to change that by celebrating these, the greatest scientists who have ever lived.

Our shirt and poster have silhouettes of scientists because the outside world does not yet recognize them. The silhouettes circle the shirt because their discoveries are always around us, ever ready to protect and cure our fragile bodies when we become hurt or ill. The poster has an inspirational quote by Akira Endo, the discoverer of the statin drugs, and an insightful quote about public health by Al Sommer, who discovered the importance of Vitamin A to childhood survival.

Welcome. We are glad you are joining our celebration!

ScienceHeroes.com's Round Logo

Our ScienceHeroes.com round logo was carefully chosen. The circle represents the cycle of life and the silhouette inside the circle is Karl Landsteiner. We chose to put Landsteiner in our logo because he made the biggest lifesaving medical discovery of the twentieth century - blood groups, leading directly to blood transfusions. We show him as a shadow because he is almost completely unknown.

ScienceHeroes.com Logo

Our website's ScienceHeroes.com logo contains an Erlenmeyer flask, which is a common piece of glassware used in laboratories. It was invented by a chemist in Germany named Emil Erlenmeyer in 1861. We use it both as a symbol of science and metaphorically. An Erlenmeyer flask is shaped somewhat triangularly. This allows for good mixing. Reading about great scientists, you will observe that it is often the mixing of ideas that lead to new discoveries. While Erlenmeyer flasks have a flat bottom so they won't accidentally tip over in a busy laboratory, we tilted ours and made it overflow to symbolize the many ideas that spill out of creative scientific minds. Enjoy our mix of lifesaving scientists and let your ideas flow!

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Experience Shines!
The Best Seniors T-Shirt in the Land



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Many cultures revere and honor their seniors for their wisdom. We think this is a great custom and are seeking to do so on our website and on our shirts! We all remember that Thomas Edison continued to invent in his senior years, but there are also lots of scientists who made lifesaving discoveries after their youth had long passed.


Vasilii Kolesov Saved More Than 2 Million Lives


A Russian, Vasilii Kolesov endured much in his life. His parent's land was forcefully collectivized and he practiced medicine throughout the Siege of Leningrad during World War II, losing some of his relatives to starvation. After the war he became interested in heart disease. Overcoming problems and devising his own tools, Kolesov performed the first coronary artery bypass surgery in 1964. He was sixty years old at the time. His pioneering work made it a common lifesaving intervention.


John Enders Saved More Than 114 Million Lives


John Enders was a notorious slow starter. He didn't decide upon a major until the age of 30. He only received his PhD from Harvard at age 33, after which he plodded unhurriedly along for almost two decades before getting his own lab at the late age of 50. But what he produced! He led a team that revolutionized virology, producing new methods which cultivated modern vaccines. He then built a team that produced possibly the most important one of modern times - the measles vaccine. When it was produced there were two million cases of measles each year in the United States. In 2008 there were 64.


Louis Pasteur Laid the Foundation for Modern Medicine

In the middle 1800's Louis Pasteur proved Germ Theory in France. Before his proof there was great speculation on where disease came from. One idea was that disease was caused by bad air (miasma). However, the prevailing theory was "spontaneous generation," a belief that living micro-organisms sprang to life from decaying organic matter. Pasteur went on to invent pasteurization and vaccination. At the age of 63 he developed the Rabies Vaccine. Louis Pasteur is a ScienceHero Legend.


Bernard Belleau Saved More than 2 Million Lives

A Canadian, Bernard Belleau's insight into the workings of drugs on the molecular level laid the groundwork for both his own research and for the research of other scientists. But theory was not enough to satisfy Belleau. He was intent on seeing his research yield practical results - that meant real drugs helping real patients. So, when he turned his attention to the plight of AIDS sufferers, he was determined to develop a drug that was superior to AZT, which had lots of bad side effects. He produced the drug 3TC which significantly improved the lives of many AIDS patients. He was 64.


Lawrence Craven Introduced Aspirin as a Preventative Medicine

Back in the 1940s, Californian Lawrence Craven made a key observation. While performing routine tonsillectomies and tooth extractions, Craven noticed that his patients who had been chewing aspirin gum to relieve their pain typically also had bleeding gums, and they experienced more frequent bleeding after minor surgeries. He hypothesized that aspirin prolonged the time it takes for blood to clot. Knowing that blood clots caused heart attacks, he recommended his male patients between 40 and 65 years of age take preventative doses of aspirin. Craven then closely followed 400 of his patients for the next two years and discovered that not a single patient had a heart attack. All this was done while he was in his 60s.


It's Never too Late

Celebrate our seasoned scientist senior citizens with us as their experience shines!

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I Read 100 Science Stories
Science Savvy T-Shirt


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After reading 100 science stories, don't you feel you have increased your understanding of science? If so, you are becoming science savvy!

A savvy person is well informed and perceptive. Starting out in science, you first must become comfortable with the tools of the trade. Test tubes, Petri dishes, and Erlenmeyer flasks are used to perform tests on body fluids, grow bacteria, and mix solutions. A stethoscope can listen to sounds the body should make and a microscope can see cells and bacteria. All are good symbols of science to place on our Award and T-shirt, but human health is more complex than some laboratory tests. We added a strand of DNA to represent the hidden truths scientists must discover in order to heal the human body.

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I Read 300 Science Stories
Science Sagacious T-Shirt




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Congratulations! Reading 300 short science stories is equivalent to reading a really big, thick science book. You have read enough to understand biographies of scientists so we placed on the award silhouettes of ten of the greatest scientists of all time, the ten scientists highlighted both on the site and in the book, Scientists Greater than Einstein: The Biggest Lifesavers of the Twentieth Century. Not only can you understand what scientists do, but you can also begin to make good decisions in your life, just as scientists make good decisions. Synonyms for sagacious are - farsighted, insightful, intelligent, perspicacious, and astucious. Others will begin to get the idea - you are smart and judicious. You are science sagacious!

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I Read 600 Science Stories
Science Sapient T-Shirt



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Having read 600 science articles is quite an accomplishment. You are now comfortable with science vocabulary, even if you don't know every word. You also have begun to see that probing for science's truths requires imagination. To represent such creativity we placed a cartoon on the award. This also represents a common scientist trait - fun. Scientists have playful minds that turn facts over and over until the inductive logic of their truth results in epiphany. Sapient describes someone who shows great wisdom and sound judgment. How has your life changed, now that you are at times a sapient one?!

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I Read 1000 Science Stories
Science Erudite T-Shirt



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Congratulations! You have read 1,000 science stories. You have read more science than 90% of the population - more than most politicians. What a great achievement!

Our artist has depicted pages exploding out of a book for the award. The stories you have read have taken root and will now be a basis for an explosion of ideas and knowledge coming from you! An erudite person is characterized by their great knowledge and by being scholarly. They do not jump to unfounded conclusions, but examine the evidence to prove their decisions. As an erudite person, you have learned the scientific method - how to look at data until you form an hypothesis, then testing the hypothesis with experimentation, and then refining the experiments until the truth is revealed. Applying this to your life, your decisions will prove sound and wise. We're delighted that you are expertly erudite!

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